Hippasa holmerae
長疣馬蛛 /
猴馬蛛

Indentification of Genus Hippasa : http://www.ecology.ugent.be/terec/personal.php?pers=sa&page=sa0


9 Genus  characteristic and Diagnostic features of genus Hippasa spiders :

1 - Posterior pair of spinnerets two segmented, longer than anterior one, conical distal segment as long as basal segment, covered with long setae (剛毛)

2 - Sternum with median dark stripe (almost all species)

3 = Anterior row of eyes little wider than second row, cephalothorax longer than wide, cephalic region narrowed in front

4 - Chelicerae strong, retromargin with three teeth

5 - Abdomen longer than wide, with dorsal markings

6 - Male palp covered with long setae, median apophysis asymmetrical

7 - Epigyne thickly covered with white setae

8 - Legs relatively long, clothed with spines and hairs

9 - Hippasa Spiders construct funnel web


 
Diagnostic feature No: 1

Posterior pair of spinnerets has two segments and are longer than anterior spinnerets.

The conical distal segment as long as basal segment is covered with long setae (剛毛).


Hippasa holmerae
 
Diagnostic feature No: 2

Hippasa holmerae's anterior row of eyes little wider than second row


Hippasa holmerae
 
Diagnostic feature No: 3

Cephalothorax longer than wide, cephalic region narrowed in front


 
Diagnostic feature No: 4

Abdomen longer than wide, with dorsal markings


 
Diagnostic feature No: 5

Male swollen palp (black) covered with long setae.


Hippasa holmerae
 
Diagnostic feature No: 6

Legs relatively long, clothed with spines and hairs.

This female Hippasa holmerae of Malaysia measured 7mm in body length.


Diagnostic feature No: 7

Hippasa Spiders construct funnel web.

 
 

Hippasa holmerae


Just beside a walking path, yet most people passed by not noticing there is a home of a spider on the grass...
The same photo with a little color leveling using Photoshop. The web is white on the grass. Click the image to enlarge...

The round web hole on the left (red arrow 1) is the entrance to the hide out at the ground underneath.

The two holes on the right side (red arrow 2) of the web are damages by big insects such as grasshoppers.

Click on the image to see enlarged photo.


Hippasa holmerae  
 
 
 
 
 
 

Agelena sp SG MEROTAI


This spider is very difficult to identify. I concluded it is a Hippasa holmerae based on majority of similar images on the internet.

It builds the familiar sheet-webs that sparkle with dew drops over grassy grounds at dawn. The spider hides in a silken funnel that leads to the web and pounces on any grasshopper that lands on it.

This species belongs to a group of Wolf Spiders whose posterior spinnerets are longer than the other spinnerets.

Most Wolf Spiders hunt on the ground. Female Wolf Spiders are immediately recognizable in the field because they roam around with a spherical egg-sac attached to their spinnerets. The egg-sac is made up of two halves united by a seam.

Newly hatched spiderlings can sometimes be seen riding on the back of their mother (right, Pardosa sp. female). The spiderlings apparently do not feed while on the mother's back, surviving on the remains of their yolk. If they fall off, they can still hang on to the mother by a silken life-line, and can easily return to the mother's back via its legs or palps. The spiderlings disperse only after undergoing a molting.



of the male. The eyes are in three rows comprising a front row of four small eyes, and a median and back row of two larger eyes each. When a male meets a female, it waves its palps and performs a series of push-up movements.


This species belongs to a group of Wolf Spiders whose posterior spinnerets are longer than the other spinnerets.

Most Wolf Spiders hunt on the ground. Female Wolf Spiders are immediately recognizable in the field because they roam around with a spherical egg-sac attached to their spinnerets. The egg-sac is made up of two halves united by a seam.
 


Checklist of Hippasa spiders

H. affinis Lessert, 1933
H. afghana Roewer, 1960
H. agelenoides Simon, 1884
H. albopunctata Thorell, 1899
H. australis Lawrence, 1927
H. babai Tanikawa, 2007
H. bifasciata Buchar, 1997
H. brechti Alderweireldt & Jocqué, 2005
H. charamaensis Gajbe, 2004
H. cinerea Simon, 1898
H. domratchevae Andreeva, 1976
H. elienae Alderweireldt & Jocqué, 2005
H. fabreae Gajbe & Gajbe, 1999
H. flavicoma Caporiacco, 1935
H. funerea Lessert, 1925
H. greenalliae Blackwall, 1867
H. hansae Gajbe & Gajbe, 1999
H. haryanensis Arora & Monga, 1994
H. himalayensis Gravely, 1924
H. holmerae Thorell, 1895
H. holmerae sundaica Thorell, 1895
H. innesi Simon, 1889
H. lamtoensis Dresco, 1981
H. loeffleri Roewer, 1955
H. loundesi Gravely, 1924
H. lycosina Pocock, 1900
H. madhuae Tikader & Malhotra, 1980
H. madraspatana Gravely, 1924
H. marginata Roewer, 1960
H. olivacea Thorell, 1887
H. partita Cambridge, 1876
H. pisaurina Pocock, 1900
H. simoni Thorell, 1887
H. sinai Alderweireldt & Jocqué, 2005
H. valiveruensis Patel & Reddy, 1993
H. wigglesworthi Gajbe & Gajbe, 1999

 

SPIDERS OF BORNEO

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